A frantic final day on the road, Republicans aiming for a big win in the midterms



CNN

Republicans are increasingly eager to win Tuesday’s midterm elections as they fire Democrats over rampant inflation and crime, while President Joe Biden calls for a delay, warning that GOP election denialists could destroy democracy.

The GOP has significant momentum in its bid to retake the House of Representatives, while the fate of the Democratic-led Senate will come down to a handful of razor-sharp races. A Republican victory in either chamber would severely curtail Biden’s presidency and set up two years of bitter political wrangling ahead of the 2024 race for the White House.

In an exclusive interview with CNN, incoming Republican House Speaker Kevin McCarthy outlined his plans for power and vowed to tackle inflation, border security and rising crime. He ordered wide-ranging investigations into the Biden administration over the withdrawal from Afghanistan, the origins of the Covid-19 pandemic and the administration’s handling of parents and school board meetings. And he didn’t rule out a push to impeach Biden.

“The first thing you’re going to see is a border control bill,” McCarthy told CNN’s Melanie Zanona.

In a sign of the critical stakes and growing concern among Democrats, four presidents – Biden, Donald Trump, Barack Obama and Bill Clinton – hit the campaign trail over the weekend.

Former President Trump, inching closer to announcing his 2024 White House bid, will wrap up a campaign that has used him to demonstrate his enduring magnetism among Republicans with a rally in Ohio on Monday for Senate candidate JD Vance. In a rained-out speech for Florida Sen. Marco Rubio on Sunday, Trump announced that voters would “elect an incredible slate of true MAGA warriors to Congress.”

Biden, who spent Saturday canvassing for Obama in a critical Senate race in Pennsylvania, warned that the nation’s core values ​​were at risk after Republicans denied the truth about the US Capitol rebellion and Speaker Nancy Pelosi’s brutal attack on her husband, Paul.

“Democracy is literally in the voting. It is a crucial moment for the nation. And we must all speak with one voice regardless of our party. There is no place for political violence in America,” Biden said.

The president will end his bid to avoid a rebuke from voters at a Democratic event in Maryland. The fact that he will be in a liberal stronghold and will not try to revive a dying MP on the last night reflects his compromised credibility and low approval ratings in an election that has returned to a referendum.

Democrats are playing defensively in blue-state strongholds like New York, Washington and Oregon and are fighting a long battle to hold on to the House of Representatives. Republicans need only a five-seat net gain to regain control. A handful of swing state battles will decide the fate of the Senate, which is currently split 50-50, including Arizona, Nevada, Georgia and Pennsylvania. Republicans are also showing renewed interest in the race between Democratic Sen. Maggie Hassan of New Hampshire and retired Army Brig. General Don Bolduc, the Democratic candidate for Trump as a brand of extremism that denies the election.

Republican National Committee Chairwoman Ronna McDaniel announced on CNN’s “State of the Union” that her party would win the House and Senate and accused Biden of forgetting Americans’ economic anxiety in his repeated warnings about democracy.

“That’s where the Democrats are: They’re inflation deniers, they’re crime deniers, they’re anti-education,” McDaniel said.

Sen. Rick Scott of Florida, chairman of the GOP Senate campaign committee, announced his party would rise to the majority on Tuesday.

“We’re going to get more than 52,” he said Sunday on NBC’s “Meet the Press,” referring to the number of seats he hoped to control.

But the president, in a joint speech with Obama on Saturday night in Pittsburgh, warned that Republican concerns about the economy were a ruse and said the GOP would cut Social Security and Medicare if they won a majority.

“Look, everyone is trying to get richer. And the richest stay rich. The middle class gets squeezed. The poor get poorer because of their policies,” Biden said.

The midterm vote is the first national vote since the chaos and violence caused by Trump’s refusal to accept the results of the last presidential election, and there are already fears that some Republican candidates will follow his example and try to defy the will of the voters, if they do. t win Some, like Sen. Ron Johnson of Wisconsin, have already expressed concerns about the integrity of the vote.

In another development on Sunday, an employee at the headquarters of Kari Lake, a Trump candidate in the Arizona gubernatorial race, opened a letter containing a suspicious white powder. Lake’s opponent, current Arizona Secretary of State Katie Hobbs, condemned the incident as “deeply troubling.”

In the frenetic final weekend of the campaign, Biden and Obama tried to outdo Democratic candidate John Fetterman in a Pennsylvania Senate race, the party’s best chance for the GOP to take the Senate seat. But Democrats are under heavy pressure in states like Arizona and Nevada that could flip the chamber to the GOP. Republicans need a net gain of one seat to win the majority.

The first major clashes in the 2024 GOP nomination contest, meanwhile, erupted in Florida with Trump and Florida Governor Ron DeSantis hosting dueling rallies Sunday night. The former president, who is expected to launch a third bid for the White House within days, came up with a new nickname Saturday for the man who could be his fiercest opponent: “Ron DeSanctimonious.”

But the Florida governor decided not to participate, directing his anger at Biden and calling his Democratic opponent, Charlie Crist, “an ass” for defying Washington officials and experts during the pandemic.

“I was willing to stand out there and take the arrows so you didn’t have to,” DeSantis said.

While rallying for Rubio, who is seeking reelection, Trump didn’t repeat DeSantis’ taunt on Sunday, but again teased the possibility of a presidential run. In another sign that the next presidential race is heating up, long-time incumbent Senator Tom Cotton of Arkansas announced that he would not enter the Republican primary.

Former President Bill Clinton was also called out Saturday in Brooklyn against Democratic New York Gov. Kathy Hochul. The Empire State should be safe territory for his party, but Hochul’s closer-than-expected election race against Republican Lee Zeldin underscores the tough national environment for Democrats.

“I know the average election rally is just ‘woop dee doo vote for me,’ but your life is on the line. For the young people in the audience, your life is on the line,” Clinton said.

As Americans struggle with the high cost of living, Democrats have been unable to resist a referendum on Biden’s economic management and presidency, with most polls predicting a Republican momentum building that could deliver a classic midterm rebuke to the first-term president.

There is growing concern about the Democrats’ strategy and whether they are effectively communicating the issues that matter most to voters. Biden’s final message to save democracy from pro-Trump candidates could be an accurate reflection of the new threats made by the former president and his acolytes. But it does nothing to ease fears about groceries or the cost of a gallon of gas.

Biden, however, has failed to effectively and personally speak to Americans longing for a return to normality after the pandemic, or to fully understand the pain of rising prices during a 40-year inflationary boom, as his White House has repeatedly repeated. marked “transient”.

If Republicans take back the House, they could put a veto on Biden’s legislative agenda and set up some dangerous political battles to raise the spending and debt ceiling. From the US withdrawal from Afghanistan and the surge of migrants along the southern border to Biden’s son, Hunter, they are promising a steady round of investigations and hearings.

The GOP majority would have plenty of candidates in Trump’s extreme image and would have the weapons to do as much damage to the president as possible before a potential rematch with Trump in 2024. And a Republican Senate would dash Biden’s hopes of balancing the judiciary after four years. Trump appointing conservative judges.