Ethan Crumbley was expected to plead guilty in the fatal shooting at Oxford High School, prosecutors said




CNN

Ethan Crumbley, the teenager accused of fatally shooting four students and injuring seven others at a Michigan high school last year, is expected to plead guilty to murder charges next week, prosecutors said Friday.

Crumbley, now 16, who was 15 at the time of the shooting, will plead guilty to 24 charges, including one count of terrorism-related death and four counts of first-degree murder, for killing four Oxford High School students. in November, according to Oakland County Chief Assistant District Attorney David Williams.

Oakland County Sheriff’s Office

“We can confirm that the shooter is expected to plead guilty to all 24 charges, including terrorism, and that prosecutors have notified the victims,” ​​Williams told CNN.

Crumbley, who previously pleaded not guilty to the charges, is expected to change his plea Monday at a hearing in Oakland County Circuit Court, where he will appear. He will not receive a plea deal as a result of the guilty plea, Williams said.

CNN has reached out to Crumbley’s attorneys for comment.

Crumbley’s parents, Jennifer and James Crumbley, were charged with four counts of involuntary manslaughter after their son allegedly opened fire at the high school. Both have pleaded not guilty, and their attorneys have argued in court papers that the charges have no legal merit and the couple should not be held responsible for the murders their son is accused of.

Michigan prosecutors argued in a court filing in August that evidence of Jennifer and James’ personal problems, including extramarital affairs and substance abuse, should be included in their trial. The couple’s lawyers have described the evidence as “extraneous”.

Prosecutors argued that Jennifer and James Crumbley played a “bigger role than buying their son a gun” and that there were many things the parents could have done, other than locking up the gun, that could have prevented the tragedy. The parents also argued that they had “every reason” to know that their son was dangerous.

“What the evidence will really show is that these defendants exposed their son to chaotic and toxic conflict, which is a known risk factor for violence,” the document says.