Trade school seeks to attract women to construction industry


A Baltimore trade school wants to bolster the region’s construction industry through diversity.The program aims to get more women into the construction industry, whether that’s through plumbing or maybe being a fire sprinkler fitter.”The time is now as far as having that power to make things happen (in) the evolving industry of people wanting to work with more diversity,” said Erica Jablonsky, with Associated Builders and Contractors of Greater Baltimore.The group’s Construction Education Academy covers all kinds of disciplines, including Kristina Humm’s interest — electrical .”I really like solving puzzles,” Humm said.Humm left teaching at the age of 27 to become an apprentice. She received an ABC scholarship, the newly named Ladies Operating for Growth in Construction (LOGIC). It gave her the right tools to get on track in a workforce lacking women.”A sad fact is 10% of construction is women. So, it’s very low and we want to change that,” Jablonsky said.Humm said that percentage can make it challenging at times. Right now, she’s just one of five women on a 1,050-person job site.”Thick skin is important. That being said, there are still a lot of really great men in the field. I have a lot of friends that are allies and support me. They listen to me,” Humm said. ABC hopes offering scholarships and other opportunities targeting women will lead to a more diversified and successful industry.

A Baltimore trade school wants to bolster the region’s construction industry through diversity.

The program aims to get more women into the construction industry, whether that’s through plumbing or maybe being a fire sprinkler fitter.

“The time is now as far as having that power to make things happen (in) the evolving industry of people wanting to work with more diversity,” said Erica Jablonsky, with Associated Builders and Contractors of Greater Baltimore.

The group’s Construction Education Academy covers all kinds of disciplines, including Kristina Humm’s interest — electrical.

“I really like solving puzzles,” Humm said.

Humm left teaching at the age of 27 to become an apprentice. She received an ABC scholarship, the newly named Ladies Operating for Growth in Construction (LOGIC). It gave her the right tools to get on track in a workforce lacking women.

“A sad fact is 10% of construction is women. So, it’s very low and we want to change that,” Jablonsky said.

Hmmm said that percentage can make it challenging at times. Right now, she’s just one of five women on a 1,050-person job site.

“Thick skin is important. That being said, there are still a lot of really great men in the field. I have a lot of friends that are allies and support me. They listen to me,” Humm said.

ABC hopes offering scholarships and other opportunities targeting women will lead to a more diversified and successful industry.


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